Friday, 28 April 2017

Next week 1st to 7th May 2017

NEXT WEEKS EVENTS

1st to 7th May 2017

The following is an extract from Bristol Geology Calendar

More details can be found in the Calendar and on the web sites of the relevant Society or organisation.


Monday




Tuesday




Wednesday

Geol Soc Field Trip
WhenWednesday, 3 May 2017
WhereClifton Suspension Bridge Visitors Centre (map)
DescriptionWestern: Hard Hat tour of the Clifton Suspension Bridge Abutments Please Book Summer Fieldtrip - FULL Contact westernregionalgroup@gmail.com for more information


Thursday

19:15
 Bath Geol Soc Lecture - The Cretaceous/Paleogene boundary debate
WhenThu, 4 May, 19:15 – 20:45
WhereBath Royal Literary and Scientific Institution, 16 Queen Square, Bath (map)
DescriptionThe Cretaceous/Paleogene boundary debate: myths, truths and uncertainties Professor Malcolm Hart, Emeritus Professor of Micropalaeontology, School of Geography, Earth & Environmental Sciences, Plymouth University The end-Cretaceous mass extinction is one of the 'big five' events in Earth history, seeing the demise of the non-avian dinosaurs, ammonites and a large percentage of the oceanic plankton. There is an on-going, heated, debate as to whether the bolide impact at Chicxulub (Mexico) or the eruption of the Deccan Volcanics were to blame, or was it a combination of both? Using field information from Denmark, Sweden, Italy, India, Brazil and the USA (Colorado, Texas and Alabama), the case for each possible cause will be reviewed. In some of these areas, especially Texas and Alabama, poor field descriptions have not helped in the debate! One critical issue, based on comparisons with the present day, is the role of ocean acidification, as this appears to be more important than previously thought.


Friday




Saturday




Sunday





Lapworth is a Contender!

Geology Museum in Contention for Museum of the Year


The Guardian reports that the Lapworth Museum of Geology in Birmingham is on the short list for the £100,000 prize as 2017 Museum of the Year.

This looks like passing geology students recruited to look interested!

The K-T revisited

There Was an Ice-Age Comet!

Here is an article suggesting (using non-geological evidence) that there was a cometary impact causing a mini ice age more than 13,000 years ago. The preceding article on this blog argues against it. No doubt a great deal of heat will be generated and, eventually, some light.

Ancient symbols carved into stone at an archaeological site in Turkey



Tuesday, 25 April 2017

Not the K-T revisited

Was there an Ice-age Comet?

HERE is a review about speculation concerning the cause of the Younger Dryas - a cold period 1,500 years long, about 12,000 years ago. In this period many of the larger mammalian species died out. A cometary impact has been suggested - this article suggests not. Please note that there is a second page, click the link at the end of the first page. Or click HERE.

Preserved mammoth skin with spots of fur. Such well preserved fossils, recovered from the Russian Tundra, let some authors speculate about a sudden death of the animals.

Saturday, 22 April 2017

Next week 24th to 30th April 2017

NEXT WEEKS EVENTS

24th to 30th April 2017

The following is an extract from Bristol Geology Calendar

More details can be found in the Calendar and on the web sites of the relevant Society or organisation.


Monday

19:30
 Dave Green's Geology of the Oceans
WhenMon, 24 April, 19:30 – 21:30
WhereWynstones School, Stroud Road, Whaddon, Gloucester (map)
DescriptionThe Geology of the Oceans past and present (including plate tectonics, environments, and current/developing ideas on oceanography and marine geology). Often termed the last frontier to be explored on Earth, there have been great advances in our understanding of the oceanic realm over the past half century. This course aims to study the main developments and what we might expect in the future, based on current research. Monday 24th April, for 10 weeks, until 10th July (not 1st nor 29th May). Held at Wynstones School, Stroud Road, Whaddon, Gloucester from 7.30-9.30pm on Mondays. Cost £70.


Tuesday

19:30
 WEGA AGM
WhenTue, 25 April, 19:30 – 20:30
WhereEarth Sciences Lecture Theatre, Wills Memorial Building, Queens Road, Bristol, United Kingdom (map)
DescriptionAnnual General Meeting, followed by slide show of last years WEGA trip to NW USA - and then FREE wine and cheese!!!


Wednesday




Thursday




Friday




Saturday

SWGA Field Trip - Martley, Herefordshire
WhenSaturday, 29 Apr 2017
WhereMeet at 10:00 am at the Crown public house (WR6 6PA) at the crossing of the B4204 and B4197 in central Martley (map)
DescriptionLeader: John Nicklin, Teme Valley Geological Society Meet at 10:00 am at the Crown public house (WR6 6PA) at the crossing of the B4204 and B4197 in central Martley. On this return visit to Martley we will be seeing the Carboniferous, Permian and Quaternary. It will be a drive and walk excursion so it would help if we could double- up at the meeting place due to limited parking at one site. There will be a few shortish walks, a couple of which are uphill and the slopes may be muddy. We may return to Martley at lunchtime where lunch could be taken at the pub (to be confirmed closer to the event).


Sunday





Footsteps in the Pyrenees

Triassic Pyrenean Reptile

The BBC reports on the finding of the footprints of a reptile in the Pyrenees of Catalonia. The maker of the footprints is probably a member of the Euparkeria and has been named as a new species Prorotodactylus mesaxonichnus.

Its importance is that it may represent the recovery of vertebrates after the major extinction at the end of the Permian. 



But what is nice about this news is that there is a link to the original article which you can read in all its glory HERE. There is an abundance of maps, photos and interpretation which makes by little bit above look deeply inadequate!

Tuesday, 18 April 2017

River Capture in the Yukon

   River Capture Happening Now!    (- well almost)

The Guardian reports how the northerly flowing waters of the Slim River were diverted into the Alsek River which flows south. The diversion happened when water from the rapidly retreating Kakawulsh glacier eroded a channel to the Kaskawulsh River and eventually the Alsek. And all this happened in four days in May last year.

A view of the ice canyon that now carries meltwater from the Kaskawulsh glacier, seen here on the right, away from the Slims river and toward the Kaskawulsh river. Photograph: Dan Shugar/University of Washington Tacoma


The source paper in Nature Geoscience can be found HERE. But, unless you have a subscription you can only read the abstract.

The New York Times reports on it with more pictures HERE.

And Canadian Broadcasting Corporation reports it HERE.